Instructions and Information About Completing the Juror Questionnaire

Please Note: The personal information collected on the Jury Questionnaire is authorized under section 18.2(3) of the Juries Act, and may be used for the purpose of verifying the information you have provided about your criminal record. If you have any questions about this collection, you may contact the Jury Selection Clerk at the Provincial Jury Centre, 720 Bay St, 2nd Floor, Toronto ON M7A 2S9 at 1-800-498-8016.

The questions of the Juror Questionnaire are set out below along with instructions for completing them.

Question 1 - Are you a Canadian Citizen?

In general, if you were born in Canada or have received your certificate of citizenship, you are a Canadian citizen. You are not a Canadian citizen if you were born in Canada and, at the time of your birth, your parents were neither citizens nor permanent residents, and if either of your parents had diplomatic status in Canada. In general, you are a Canadian citizen if you were born outside Canada and one of your parents was a Canadian citizen at the time of your birth because the parent was either born in Canada or naturalized in Canada.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Clause 2(b) of the Juries Act requires that all jurors be Canadian citizens and clause 638(1)(d) of the Criminal Code require that all jurors in criminal trials be Canadian citizens.
  • Being a citizen of Canada demonstrates a legal commitment to certain rights and duties, including participating in jury duty.

Question 2 - Are you 18 years of age or older?

If you are at least 18 years old or will be turning 18 before January 1st of the coming year, please mark an “X” in the “Yes” box for this question.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Clause 2(c) of the Juries Act requires that all jurors be 18 years of age and older.
  • This question ensures that only adults are on the jury roll. Individuals are the legal age of majority when they reach 18 years old.

Question 3 - Have you attended court for jury selection in response to a summons in this or the two preceding years?

Persons who have attended for jury duty at any time within the preceding two years are not qualified to serve as jurors and should mark an “X” in the “Yes” box.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Under subsection 3(4) of the Juries Act, individuals who have recently appeared for jury duty are ineligible to serve as jurors (see timeline below).
  • If an individual has come to court in response to a jury summons during this three-year period, he or she is not eligible to serve as a juror.
  • The intent is to make sure individuals are not put on the jury roll and asked to serve again if they have recently come to court for jury duty.

Question 4 - Does your work exempt you from jury service?

If you are presently employed or licensed in one of the professions listed under instruction 4 on the "instructions for completing the juror questionnaire", which accompanied the questionnaire sent to your address, you are not qualified to serve as a juror and you should mark the "yes" box with an X.

Occupations that are ineligible:

  • A legally qualified medical practitioner, coroner or veterinary surgeon who is actively engaged in practice
  • A police officer
  • A firefighter regularly employed by a fire department
  • A superintendent, jailer or keeper of a prison, correctional institution or lockup
  • The warden of a penitentiary
  • A sheriff or a sheriff's officer
  • Armed forces personnel of the regular and special forces and members of the reserve forces on active service
  • A barrister and/or solicitor or a student-at-law
  • An officer of a court of justice
  • A judge or a justice of the peace
  • A member of the Privy Council of Canada, the Executive Council of Ontario, the Senate, the House of Commons or the Assembly

Why is this question being asked?

Subsection 3(1) of the Juries Act identifies ineligible occupations for jury duty.

  • These occupations are exempt from jury duty for historical reasons.
  • There could be a presumption that some professions are biased in favour of the Crown or the accused and so they are ineligible for jury duty.
  • Because the jury roll is used not only for criminal trials, but also for civil trials and coroner’s inquests, there are professions that were considered to have specialized knowledge making them ineligible as jurors. For example, medical doctors, veterinary surgeons, and coroners.
  • Other professions were seen as essential to the daily operation of the community, such as firefighters.

Question 5 - Do you have any physical or mental disability that would prevent you from serving as a juror?

Every effort will be made to provide necessary accommodations for people with disabilities to serve on a jury. For example: use of personal assistive devices, sign language interpreters, or other supports. If you think that any of these or other accommodations would enable you to serve on a jury, your answer to this question should be "No." The presiding Judge will decide whether your request for accommodation will be granted.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Clause 4(a) of the Juries Act exempts people who have a disability that would seriously impair his or her ability to serve. Clause 638(1) (e) of the Criminal Code allows people to be dismissed from jury duty in criminal trials if they are physically unable to serve even with the aid of support services.
  • The intent of this question is to allow a person who believes that she or he may have a physical or mental disability that would seriously impair her or his ability to discharge the duties of a juror to self-exclude themselves from the jury process.
  • This question also allows the same individual to participate in the jury process if they believe that their disability will not impair their duties as a juror.
  • Accommodations are provided for jurors with disabilities. A judge has the final decision about whether accommodations can be provided.

Question 6 - Have you been convicted of any criminal offence that can be prosecuted by way of an indictment for which you have not been granted a record suspension or pardon?

Criminal offences do not include violations of provincial statutes, such as traffic law offences (e.g., speeding) under the Highway Traffic Act.

If you were found guilty of a criminal offence and have been granted a discharge or a record suspension (formerly pardon) then you should mark an “X” in the "No" box for this question.

Criminal offences are prosecuted either by way of indictment or summary conviction.

Indictable offences are serious crimes and subject to severe penalties including, for some offences (e.g., homicide), life imprisonment. Summary conviction offences are considered less serious and are generally subject to lesser penalties. In most cases, the maximum penalty for a summary offence is a fine of $5000 and/or six months in prison.

Most offences can be either summary or indictable depending on the circumstances of the case. Others can only be prosecuted by indictment or only by summary conviction.

The list below identifies summary offences that would allow you to remain eligible for jury duty, despite having been convicted of this type of offence. If you have been convicted of an offence listed below, you may still be eligible for jury duty and should mark an “X” in the “No” box for this question.

Criminal Code Offences

  • Assisting deserter [Canadian Forces] — Section 54
  • Offences in relation to members of R.C.M.P. — Section 56
  • Member of an unlawful assembly without concealing identity — Section 66(1)
  • Engaging in prize fight — Section 83
  • Carrying a weapon while attending a public meeting — Section 89
  • Make a statement under oath or solemn affirmation by affidavit knowing that statement to be false — Section 134
  • Advertising reward and immunity — Section 143
  • Nudity in public place or in public view — Section 174
  • Causing disturbance in public place; indecent exhibition or exposure; loitering; or disturbing peace and quiet of occupants of a dwelling-house — Section 175
  • Disturbing or interrupting assemblage met for religious worship or moral, social or benevolent purpose 176(2),(3)
  • Trespass at night — Section 177
  • Deposit, throw or inject an offensive volatile substance — Section 178
  • Vagrancy — Section 179
  • Being found in a common gaming house or betting house, or being an owner, landlord, lessor, tenant, occupier or agent who permits the use of a place as a common gaming house or betting house — Section 201(2)
  • Buying, taking or receiving lot, ticket or other device in relation to lotteries and games of chance 206(4)
  • Participating in an unlawful lottery scheme — Section 207(3)(b)
  • Participating in an unlawful lottery scheme on an international cruise ship — Section 207.1(3)(b)
  • Being an inmate of, or being found in, a common bawdy house; or being an owner or person otherwise having charge or control of a place who permits the use of that place as a common bawdy-house — Section 210(2)
  • Knowingly take, transport, direct or offer to take person to common bawdy-house — Section 211
  • Stopping or impeding traffic for purpose of offering, providing or obtaining sexual services for consideration — Section 213(1)
  • Communicating with any person for purpose of offering sexual services near or in view of school ground, playground or daycare — Section 213(1.1)
  • Failure to keep watch while towing person on water skis, surfboard, etc. — Section 250(1)
  • Towing person on water skis, surfboard etc. after dark — Section 250(2)
  • Unauthorized use of bodily substance or disclosure of physical coordination tests — Section 258.1(5)
  • Failure to perform duty to safeguard opening in ice or excavation on land where no death or bodily harm results — Section 263(3)
  • Publication of document pertaining to an “admissibility of evidence” application — Section 276.3
  • Publication of document pertaining to a “production of a record” application — Section 278.9
  • Taking motor vehicle or vessel without consent — Section 335
  • Dealing in marked timber or lumbering equipment of another person — Section 339(2)
  • Failure to comply with record keeping requirements associated with automobile master keys — Section 353(4)
  • Fraudulently obtaining food, beverage or accommodation — Section 364
  • Pretending to practice witchcraft — Section 365
  • Fraudulently obtaining transportation — Section 393(3)
  • Falsifying an employment record — Section 398
  • Obtaining carriage by false billing — Section 401
  • Personation at competitive or qualifying examination held under authority of law or in connection with a university, college or school (or who availing self of the results of such personation) — Section 404
  • Falsely claiming royal warrant — Section 413
  • Unlawful use of military uniforms or certificates — Section 419
  • Offences by employers with respect to trade unions — Section 425
  • Issuing trading stamps — Section 427
  • Interference with the saving of wreck — Section 438(2)
  • Interference with marine signal — Section 439
  • Interference with boundary lines on land — Section 442
  • Breaching a prohibition or restitution order with respect to animal ownership — Section 447.1(2)
  • Manufacture, production, sale or possession of slugs and tokens intended to be fraudulently used as substitutes for tokens in a token-operated device — Section 454
  • Defacing a current coin — Section 456
  • Making, publishing, printing, executing, issuing, distributing or circulating a likeness of a current bank-note or a government or bank obligation or security — Section 457
  • Knowingly import, export, manufacture, sell instruments or literature for illicit drug use — Section 462.2
  • Attempting to commit, or being an accessory after the fact to, an offence punishable on summary conviction — Section 463(c)
  • Counselling an offence punishable on summary conviction that is not committed — Section 464(b)
  • Conspiracy to commit offence punishable on summary conviction — Section 465(1)(d)
  • Failure to comply with publication bans — Section 486.6
  • Failure to comply with preservation demand made under section 487.012 — Section 487.0197
  • Failure to comply with preservation or production order made under sections 487.013 to 487.018 — Section 487.0198
  • Failure to destroy data in accordance with section 487.0194 — Section 487.0199
  • Improper use of bodily substances taken under warrant — Section 487.08(3)
  • Publication of document with information with respect to search warrant without consent of persons referenced in warrant — Section 487.2
  • Failure to comply with subsections 490.02911(1) or (2) – i.e. failure to advise police service of verdict of NCR for an offence committed outside Canada upon entry into Canada or, if already in Canada, to advise police service of a change of address — Section 490.0312
  • Failure to comply with an order directing that a matter not be published — Section 517
  • Failure to comply with an order restricting publication of evidence taken at a preliminary inquiry — Section 539(3)
  • Publish or report an admission or confession tendered in evidence at a preliminary inquiry — Section 542(2)
  • Publish or broadcast any part of a trial where the jury was not present before jury retires to consider verdict — Section 648
  • Disclosure of information relating to jury proceedings — Section 649
  • Using or authorizing the use of an application for federal employment that contravenes subsection 672.37(2) by including a section that requires disclosure of NCR material — Section 672.37(3)
  • Failure to comply with an order restricting publication of information that could identify victim or witness — Section 672.501(11)
  • Improper use or disclosure of bodily substance or results of test provided under a probation order — Section 732.11(4)
  • Improper use or disclosure of bodily substance or results of test provided under a conditional sentence order — Section 742.31(4)
  • Improper use or disclosure of bodily substance or results of test provided under a recognizance under sections 810 through 810.2 — Section 810.4(4)

Controlled Drugs and Substances Act

  • Possession of 30 grams or less of cannabis (marihuana) or 1 gram or less of cannabis resin — Section 4(5)

All other Criminal Code or Controlled Drugs and Substances Act offences can be prosecuted by way of indictment and you should therefore answer “Yes”.

If you answer "yes" to any of questions 3, 4, 5 or 6 do not answer the questions in section C. Go directly to section D and sign to certify that the information you have just provided is true.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Under clause 4(b) of the Juries Act jurors can be ineligible for jury duty due to personal reasons, including past convictions of this nature.
  • Clause 638(1) (c) of the Criminal Code also allows potential jurors to be dismissed because they have been convicted of an offence for which they were sentenced to prison for more than 12 months.
  • Having people serve on a jury who themselves have certain types of criminal convictions undermines confidence in the justice system.

Question 7 - Provide your gender and date of birth:

When indicating gender, please mark an "x" in either the Male or Female box.

Please ensure that you enter your date of birth using the following format: YY-MM-DD. For example, if you were born January 2nd, 1960, you would enter 60-01-02.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Subsections 18.2 (1) and (3) of the Juries Act provide the authority for the collection of information for the purpose of completing a criminal record check.
  • This information is required by the Ontario Provincial Police who need the information to complete random Criminal Police Information Centre checks on potential jurors.

Question 8 - Provide current or most recent occupation:

Enter your current occupation. If you are retired or not working, enter your last occupation.

Why is this question being asked?

  • As noted in question 4, subsection 3 (1) of the Juries Act identifies ineligible occupations for jury duty.

Questions 9a and 9b

a) Do you speak, read and understand English?
b) Do you speak, read and understand French?

If you are chosen to sit on a jury, the trial will be conducted in either English or French. If indicating a "Yes" response to English or French, you must be fluent in either language and understand it well enough to follow a trial where all evidence and legal instructions will be given in English or French, without the assistance of an interpreter.

American Sign Language (ASL) or Langue des Signes Quebecoise (LSQ) interpretation can be provided for people who are deaf, with approval by a judge.

Why is this question being asked?

  • Subsection 8 (2) of the Juries Act identifies the language requirements for jurors. Clause 638(1)(f) of the Criminal Code identifies language requirements in criminal trials.
  • Court is conducted in the two official languages of Canada, English or French.
  • This question ensures that individuals who are being considered for jury duty can understand the language in which the trial will be held.
  • Interpreters are not arranged for jurors, with the exception of sign language interpreters.

Question 10 - Business telephone and residential telephone:

Starting with area code, please provide your business and residential telephone numbers.

Using the contact information that is made available under Question #10, court staff may contact individuals who have been summoned for jury duty to let them know if there are changes to the dates and times that they are required to come to the courthouse.

Why is this question being asked?

  • This is administrative information.
  • Court staff contact individuals who have been summoned using this information to let them know if there are changes to the dates and times that they are required to the come to the courthouse.
  • For example, if a jury panel is cancelled, all those summoned are contacted and told they do not have to come to the courthouse.

To Complete the Questionnaire

Please complete the questionnaire by signing your name and indicating the date of signature. Once signed, you must return this form to the Provincial Jury Centre.

For further information about the Juror Questionnaire

If you have any questions or if you require further assistance in completing the questionnaire, please contact the Provincial Jury Centre at 1-800-498-8016 between 8:30 am and 5:00 pm Monday to Friday.

For information about Jury Duty

For comments or additional questions related to jury duty, please email juryduty@ontario.ca