Steps in a civil action

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The following is a general overview of the components of a civil action in the Superior Court. Each case will vary.

Note that applications follow a different procedure.

Also, there are different procedures under the following rules:

  1. Simplified Procedure under Rule 76 (PDF)
  2. Civil Case Management under Rule 77 (in Toronto, Windsor and Ottawa only) (PDF)
  3. Mandatory Mediation under rules 24.1 and 75.1 (in Toronto, Windsor and Ottawa only) (PDF)

For more information about these procedures, including flowcharts which summarize the processes, visit the Ministry of the Attorney General website at: http://www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/english/courts/. You may also wish to consult the Rules of Civil Procedure.

Overview of a civil action

Bringing a claim

The plaintiff prepares a statement of claim, which contains a concise statement of material facts on which the plaintiff relies. The court issues the statement of claim.

The plaintiff serves the statement of claim on all defendants and files an affidavit of service with the court.

If the defendant does not defend the action, this affidavit of service is necessary for the plaintiff to obtain default judgment.

Defending a claim

The defendant prepares a statement of defence and serves it on the plaintiff, and files a copy with the court together with proof of service.

The defendant may counterclaim against the plaintiff, crossclaim against a co-defendant, or make a 3rd party claim against a non-party.

Where a defendant fails to deliver a statement of defence within the prescribed time, the plaintiff may obtain default judgment from the court registrar or a judge, depending on the type of claim.

Discovery

The parties must agree on a discovery plan if they wish to obtain evidence through the discovery process.

The parties must deliver to all other parties an affidavit that lists all relevant documents in the party's power, possession or control. Copies of the documents must be made available at a party's request.

A party may serve a notice of examination (Form 34A - PDF) on an opposing party, indicating a time and place where the party must attend to answer questions under oath. The examination is recorded, and where requested, transcribed.

Generally, only parties may be examined for discovery. The maximum time limit each party has to examine persons for discovery is seven hours. This time limit applies regardless of the number of persons to be examined for discovery.

Setting an action down for trial

Either party may set the action down for trial by serving and filing the trial record. A trial record includes a copy of all pleadings and orders relating to the trial.

The registrar places the action on the trial list, or in some locations, trial dates are fixed by a judge in assignment court.

Pre-trial conference

The parties must attend a pre-trial conference before a judge or court officer to attempt to settle the case or narrow the issues.

Trial

The plaintiff and defendant make opening statements. The plaintiff's witnesses are examined and cross-examined. The defendant's witnesses are examined and cross-examined. The plaintiff and defendant make closing arguments.

A judge may give judgment in court right after both sides have finished presenting their cases. Sometimes, however, the judge may not give the judgment right away but will give the decision later (this is called reserving judgment).


a. Bringing a claim

The Rules of Civil Procedure set out requirements for statements of claim, including what they need to contain and what their format should be.

To start your action, you must have your statement of claim issued by the court. You can do this by bringing the following to the court:

  1. The appropriate Court fee payable to the Minister of Finance. This fee is for the cost of handling your court claim. If you win your case, any fees you have paid may be added to the money you are entitled to collect.
  2. Enough copies of your statement of claim. One copy will be retained in the court file until you return the original with proof of service. You will require one copy for yourself and one copy to serve on each named defendant. Copies can be made at the court office; however, the court charges a photocopy fee for each copy required.
  3. A completed Form 14F - PDF (Information for Court Use).

You or someone acting on your behalf must come to the court in person to file these documents. Documents sent to the court by mail or courier will not be accepted.

Once your statement of claim is issued, it must be served on the defendants within 6 months, unless you have obtained a court order directing otherwise. Service (delivery) of documents is a very important requirement in processing your claim. To determine how you may serve your claim, review the Rules of Civil Procedure. The Rules of Civil Procedure also set out how you can prove that your claim was served, which may be necessary if the defendant does not respond.

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b. Defending a claim

How you respond to a claim depends on a few factors:

Do you agree that you owe the money claimed?
Do you disagree completely, or with just part of the claim?
Do you feel the person suing you owes you money, or that it is someone else's fault altogether?

Depending on how you answer these questions, there are different ways to respond to a claim. The options might include:

  1. File a statement of defence;
  2. File a notice of intent to defend, followed by a statement of defence within ten days;
  3. Try to settle all or part of the claim with the person suing you.
  4. Counterclaim against the person suing you,
  5. Cross claim against another defendant in the action, and/or
  6. Start a third party claim against someone who is not a party to the action.

Your statement of defence (Form 18A - PDF) must be served on every other party in accordance with the Rules of Civil Procedure, within prescribed time limits. A copy of the statement of defence must also be filed with the court.

A lawyer is in the best position to advise you on how you should respond to a statement of claim, and which documents should be served and filed with the court.

You should not ignore the claim. If you do not file a statement of defence, you may be noted in default.

Being noted in default has a number of consequences. One consequence is that you will be deemed to admit all allegations of fact in the plaintiff's statement of claim. Once you are noted in default, the party suing you can seek a default judgment against you. See Rule 19 of the Rules of Civil Procedure for more information regarding default proceedings.

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c. Discovery

The purpose of discovery is to obtain information about the opposing party's evidence prior to trial. There are two main types of discovery: discovery of documents and examinations for discovery (where parties are asked questions).

Discovery has a number of significant benefits:

  1. It enables parties to assess the strengths and weaknesses of each side's case prior to trial.
  2. It assists the parties in narrowing the issues for trial.
  3. It can help parties to reach a settlement.
  4. It makes the trial process more efficient and fair.

Discovery Plans

If you wish to obtain evidence using discovery then you and the other party must agree to a discovery plan.

The discovery plan must include specific information (see rule 29.1.03(3)). In preparing the discovery plan, the parties must consider the Sedona Canada Principles addressing electronic discovery .

The plan must be agreed to within 60 days after the close of pleadings and before making any attempts to obtain the evidence through the discovery process.

Documentary Discovery

You must serve a sworn affidavit of documents (Form 30A [PDF] for individuals, or Form 30B [PDF] for corporations and partnerships);by the date agreed upon in your discovery plan.

An affidavit of documents must list all documents relevant to any matter in issue in an action that are or have been in your possession, control or power.

Documents are defined broadly and can include videotapes and information in electronic form, such as e-mails. There can be serious consequences for failing to disclose a relevant document.

After you serve your affidavit of documents, you must still disclose any new documents that you find if they are relevant. You can do this by serving a supplementary affidavit (Form 4D - PDF).

You may be entitled to inspect a document in another party's possession, and another party may be entitled to inspect your documents. The circumstances in which a document must be produced (i.e. provided to another party) are outlined in the Rules of Civil Procedure.

There are also limited circumstances in which the court can order production of a document in the possession, control or power of a person that is not a party to the action.

Examinations for Discovery

Examinations provide parties an opportunity to ask each other questions, under oath, in advance of the trial.

A party may serve a notice of examination on an opposing party, indicating a time and place where the party must attend to answer questions under oath. The examination is recorded, and where requested, transcribed. Generally, only parties may be examined. There are limited circumstances in which a non-party can be examined as well.

Each party may examine other parties for a maximum of seven hours in total. This seven-hour time limit applies regardless of the number of persons to be examined by a party. A party may be granted more time for discovery examinations if the parties agree or through a court order.

You must bring to your examination for discovery all of the documents listed in your affidavit of documents that are not privileged. You may be required to bring other documents and things as well.

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d. Setting the action down for trial

Once you are ready, and provided you are not noted in default, you can have your case set down for trial. This notifies the court that the case is ready to be tried, and the trial scheduling process can begin.

To have your case set down for trial, you will need to prepare and file your trial record. The Rules of Civil Procedure outline the requirements of a trial record (see Rule 48.03). A trial record includes documents such as copies of the pleadings and copies of any orders previously made in your case.

If you are the plaintiff in an undefended action, you can have your case set down for trial by filing your trial record with the court. Undefended actions go to trial when other avenues to obtain default judgment have been unsuccessful. See Rule 19 of the Rules of Civil Procedure for more information regarding default proceedings.

If your action is defended, you can have your case set down for trial by serving your trial record on the other parties and filing it with the court with proof of service, and upon payment of the appropriate fee.

Sixty (60) days after you set the case down for trial, the registrar will place the action on the trial list, or, in some locations, the trial date will be fixed by a judge in assignment court.

If you do not have your action placed on the trial list within two years after the defendant files a statement of defence, your action can be dismissed for delay. You will be given notice of this impending dismissal.

Your action can also be dismissed for delay if more than 180 days have passed since the date your statement of claim was issued and no statement of defence has been filed, the action has not been set down for trial or concluded by final order or judgment. You will be given notice of this impending dismissal.

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e. Pre-trial conference

A pre-trial must be held in all actions before a trial is held. A pre-trial is an opportunity for the parties to discuss a number of matters, including: settlement, whether the issues can be simplified, and how long the hearing is expected to last. A judge who conducts a pre-trial conference will not preside at the trial unless all parties consent in writing.

Within 180 days of an action being set down for trial, the parties must schedule with the registrar a date and time for the pre-trial which is acceptable for all parties. If the parties do not schedule a pre-trial within 180 days of the set down for trial, the registrar will schedule a pre-trial date (unless there is any earlier court order which provides otherwise).

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f. The Trial

A civil trial may proceed before a judge alone, or before a judge and jury. Unless a statute provides otherwise, a party may request that a judge and jury hear the action by filing a jury notice in accordance with the Rules of Civil Procedure.

At a trial, each party will present his or her evidence by calling witnesses and entering documents or objects as exhibits.

There will be an opportunity to introduce the judge or jury to your case at the outset of the trial during opening statements.

At the end of the trial, you will be given an opportunity to make closing arguments about the evidence heard during the trial and how the law applies to your case.

An order can be requested and made, generally at the beginning of the trial, to exclude witnesses from the courtroom until it is their turn to testify. This ensures that their evidence is not affected by what other people say during the trial.

If any of your witnesses are reluctant to attend the trial, you can require them to do so by serving them with a summons to witness (Form 53A - PDF) along with the required attendance monies. You may be required to file an affidavit of service of the summons.

There can be serious consequences for failing to attend a trial. For example, the trial could proceed in your absence or your claim may be dismissed.

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